What Ireland will look like in 30 years as global warming continues and parts go under water

The world is on track to miss climate action targets, which will cause irreversible damage to the earth’s ozone layer.

According to the latest report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), humanity must change course and leave behind the age of fossil fuels and embrace a new era of life to avoid detrimental results.

The effects of global warming have already been seen around the world, with extreme weather events such as floods and wildfires becoming more frequent.

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Aerial photograph overlooking green fields and buildings in Dublin, Ireland.

However, the IPCC said it was still technically possible for countries to reduce carbon pollution if action was taken immediately.

A coordinated effort to develop renewable energy sources, overhaul transport systems, restructure cities, improve agriculture and extract carbon from the air could put the planet on a more sustainable path, but huge investments of from world leaders are needed.

The IPCC has warned that historic investments in fossil fuels have made it difficult for some to support plans for a greener future, but if the planet is to survive, more must be done.

As an island, Ireland is in a unique position and at serious risk of entering unprecedented territory as sea levels rise, submerging much of Ireland’s coastline under water.

The IPCC released a map late last year detailing the areas of Ireland that could be underwater in just ten years.

The map showed that areas of Dublin, Cork, Belfast, Derry and Limerick were all at serious risk as temperatures continue to rise around the world.

The capital will become one of the worst affected areas in the country, with water cutting through land, including Howth, creating a new island.

Areas such as Sandymount, North Bull Island, Portmarnock and Malahide are also expected to be underwater shortly.



Some of the most populated areas of Dublin City will be under water
Some of the most populated areas of Dublin City will be under water

Areas of Cork such as Cobh and Youghal are in grave danger, while Cork City will bear the brunt of the damage with the famous Marina Market, half of UCC and the whole of Páirc Ui Chaoimh facing the put under the sea if things don’t. change.



The famous Marina Market, half of UCC and the whole of Páirc Ui Chaoimh are at risk of being put under the sea if things don't change
The famous Marina Market, half of UCC and the whole of Páirc Ui Chaoimh are at risk of being put under the sea if things don’t change

The sunny south east will also be hit with some changes as holiday villages such as Kilmore Quay and Rosslare will be hit hard.

Curracloe will also see a significant amount of flooding.



Wexford underwater
Wexford underwater

Clare and Limerick will see attractions such as Bunratty Castle, Shannon Airport and Adare Manor Golf Course cease to exist.

While the northern half of the country will not escape water either, as Letterkenny will also lose landmass to the ocean.

Belfast will also be heavily affected as large swaths of the city, including landmarks such as George Best Airport and the Titanic Museum, will be flooded.

Portlaw and Carrick-On-Suir will be the worst affected areas of Waterford, with low level land laying becoming submerged.

However, the erosion of the Irish coastline could still accelerate as the map does not take into account extreme flooding, storms, inland flooding or rainfall.

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Teresa H. Sadler